Israel Dead Sea

DEAD SEA TRAVEL, HOTELS AND TOURISM GUIDE

Introduction :

The Negev region covers about half of the land of Israel. It is inhabited by only eight percent of the population, living mainly in the northern part, supported by an agricultural and industrial economy. The Negev region southern area is a parched out zone characterized by low sandstone hills and plains, abounding with canyons, often produce flash floods. Southward, the region gives way to an area of bare fisted peaks, craters and rock-strewn plateaus, where the climate is drier and the mountains are higher.

The Dead Sea is the lowest point on earth, at about 1,300 feet (400 m.) below sea level. The area richness with potash, magnesium and bromine made it the perfect location for visitors seeking for a relaxing and nutritious vacation.

Dead Sea Tourism Guide – The water of the Dead Sea contains 21 minerals including magnesium, calcium, bromime and potassium. 12 of these are found in no other sea or ocean and some are recognized for imparting a relaxed feeling, nourishing the skin, activating the circulatory system and for easing rheumatic discomfort and metabolic disorders. As an example, the Dead Sea contains 10 times more salts and minerals than the Mediterranean Sea. The high salt and mineral concentration enables everyone to float in its waters but doesn’t allow the proliferation of fish and other marine life.

Ein Gedi – Nature Reserve – Two streams flow in the reserve. There are footpaths for hikers and wild animals roam the reserve. The waters running through the reserve together with the desert climate have created a large volume of tropical plants and a home for wildlife.

Masada – Masada is the most visited of all archeaological sites in Israel and one of the most popular climbs. It can be reached from two directions today, either from the Dead Sea in the east, via the original and steep “snake path” or from the west on a path built from the old Roman ramp, offerin g an easier climb or a cable car to ease the ascent . Facing east towards the Dead Sea:

Ben Gurion’s Desert Home – The Hut was the home of Paula and David Ben-Gurion from 1953, when they joined the kibbutz as members. After Ben Gurion died, it was decided that the hut would be preserved as a museum and memorial site, demonstrating Ben Gurion’s heritage with regard to settling the desert.

Shivta National Park – Travelers heading to Eilat or Mitzpeh Ramon and using the western border route may take the opportunity of visiting Shivta and observing the three restored Byzantine churches and some of the achievements of these ancient cultures.

Scrolls from the Dead Sea – In 1947, young Bedouin shepherds, searching for a stray goat in the Judean Desert, entered a long-untouched cave and found jars filled with ancient scrolls. That initial discovery by the Bedouins yielded seven scrolls and began a search that lasted nearly a decade and eventually produced thousands of scroll fragments from eleven caves. During those same years, archaeologists searching for a habitation close to the caves that might help identify the people who deposited the scrolls, excavated the Qumran ruin – a complex of structures located on a barren terrace between the cliffs where the caves are found and the Dead Sea.

HOTELS IN THE DEAD SEA

Carlton Hotel Dead Sea – Arava Wing Caesar Premier Hotel dead Sea
Crowne Plaza Hotel Dead Sea Ein Gedi Resort Hotel Dead Sea
Gardens Hotel and Spa Dead Sea Golden Tulip Hotel Dead Sea
Hod Hamidbar Resort and Spa Hotel Dead Sea Le meridien Spa Hotel Dead Sea
Lot Spa Hotel Dead Sea Magic Nirvana Hotel Dead Sea – All Inclusive Resort
Novotel Thalassa Hotel Dead Sea Sheraton Moriah Hotel Dead Sea
Courtesy

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